Coverplate

Me & My Reso

Me & My Reso

My Awesome Deneve / Nichols Custom Reso - Adirondack Spruce Top, Brazillian Rosewood Back & Sides, D45 Style Inlay, Gold Hardware supplied by the nice folks @ Beard! I call it my banjo killer! Easily the loudest reso I've ever played with absolutely superb tone. Deneve Really hit this one out of the park!

Coverplate History

 

The Original coverplate on the Original Dobro® in the late 1920’s was of the pattern shown above as Original Fan- # 1. The Metal Instrument version # 2 and the Poinsettia  # 3 showed up later. These 3 coverplates were used on most of the Dobro® labeled Guitars until they shut down during WW II. Resonator guitars made for other retailers during that period (usually less expensive models) utilized these standard coverplates plus several other less expensive designs. These other designs were not usually found on the Dobro® labeled guitars.

It should be noted that we’re speaking of the hole pattern as being the standard for identification purposes.  For example, there were several versions of the # 1 fan pattern. They all looked the same, but… some had the 12 o’clock screw pattern, some were “flatter” than others, some had a slightly wider mounting flange, etc.

Metal guitars made by Regal used the pattern shown # 5 on some (maybe not all) of these metal boxes. This # 5 pattern showed up on some wood boxes also. We have personally seen it on a Model 45 spruce top and on several regular Regal made Model 37.    

 After the War the brothers again started making limited numbers of guitars. There are no records or sales brochures to show what coverplates they used until a Standel Co. Brochure was issued. A picture in this early brochure shows a 12 fret box with the metal box # 2 coverplate. The new line of 14 fret boxes were developed around 1962  and a later Standel Co Brochure shows the new 14 fret boxes still with the # 2 coverplate. With one exception,every brochure from this era and all new Dobros built, including those from Mosrite features this coverplate until the old  #1 pattern re-appeared in 1969.

The use of this # 2 coverplate raises a lot of questions because most history articles state that all the metal dies and tooling were lost / rusted during or after the war. This is not true. In the first place, Ed and Rudy were struggling in the 1950’s to make a living  building instruments and probably couldn’t afford the very expensive tooling for making coverplates. Then, here is a quote from one of their early 1 page brochures…”The same tools and dies are again being used to make all the parts for the old Dobro® and for the new Original.” The new Original being the new 14 fret model.   A discussion with Don Young who worked with the Dopyeras off and on from 1972 until 1988 states that much of the 1930’s tooling was used until the move to Huntington Beach. He agrees that the old tooling was used to make the coverplate and that Ed and Rudy could not have afforded the new tooling. Why they chose to use this coverplate may well be that it was the only usable coverplate tooling at the time. Also, there’s Tut Taylors comment  about the new wooden 14 fret models …”the new dobros differed from the old ones, having a 14 fret neck and body style after the old metal models, the coverplate being identical.” The new box appears much like the old metal boxes. The brothers being the brothers may well have decided on a wood replica of the old metal boxes.

 read more »

WTB LYRE COVERPLATE

WANT TO BUY A LYRE COVERPLATE ,NOONE HAS ONE FOR SALE THAT I CAN FIND AND I REALLY WOULD LIKE TO HAVE ONE .

WILL PAY BY PAYPAL, CHECK , MONEY ORDER ,WHATEVER REQUIRED .

 

James DMAG ziricote/maple coverplate

James DMAG ziricote/maple coverplate

James DMAG ziricote/maple coverplate

User login